Fuel For Thought
by Rod Morris
Copyright © 2006 Top Gun Motorcycles. All rights reserved.  Distribution or publication of this document (electronic or otherwise)
is prohibited without the express written consent of the author. For more information or to request permission to publish this
document, please see our
contact page. For information on our pledge to maintain your privacy click here. To learn more about
your friends at Top Gun Motorcycles, read about us
here.
01/01/2013

Welcome To Fuel For Thought

Written by: Rod Morris

Glossary of terms and abbreviations:
MSM - Multisurface Motorcycles/Motorcyclist
MMP - Multisurface Motorcycle Products
TGMP - Top Gun Motorcycle Products

MSM Weight Classifications:
Lightweight (LW) - up to 250lbs
Middleweight (MW) - 251lbs - 300lbs
Light-Heavyweight (LHW) - 301lbs - 350lbs
Heavyweight (HW) - 351lbs - 400lbs
What's NEW!
Top Gun Motorcycles
How To Ruin Your Holiday Ride

As usual during the winter I try to take advantage of any good weather days to get out on
my KLR and I did on Sunday, December 23, 2012.

Of course living in San Diego makes winter riding an easy task even when the weather
reports say chance of rain. If they report anything below 50% chance, you can start
getting your riding gear on because it means no rain, just not much sunshine.

We did have light rain on Saturday 12/22 and there was frost on the ground Sunday
morning at our 4200 foot level and in the mid 30 degrees so I decided to wait until 10 to
head out when things were melted. By the time I had ridden the 5 miles through our local
Indian Reservation the slushy wet was gone but the weather was still cold and every tree
shaded area or high bank still had lots of wet which hampered any high speed cornering.

I rode highway 94 west through Campo, Potrero, past the Tecate turnoff and about
another 30 miles to Honey Springs Rd. where I headed north. As I gained altitude a few
sprinkles started coming down as did the temperature so I headed back south to 94. I was
hoping the roads would be dried out more at the lower elevation so I wouldn’t have to
death grip the bars in the dark wet corners.

Things had dried out and I enjoyed curvy Hwy 94 for about 15 miles where I pulled off for
a quick break. While there I heard a siren coming the same direction I was headed and a
fire truck came by. I gave him lots of time to get far up the mountain before I took off. I
met a number of vehicles coming toward me and noticed that several drivers would signal
to slow down. That meant one thing – accident.
I was right. Several fire trucks and an
ambulance were parked and I could
see a motorcycle near-by that was
crunched pretty good. Another 7 or 8
bikes were parked so I knew it was
“bike down on Hwy 94” and his riding
buddies were all huddled around
waiting for injury news. One group
member was directing traffic and I
asked what happened. He said his
friend was a novice rider and was at
the back of the pack and none of the
group even knew he had gone down
until they got to a straight area and
realized they were missing one rider.  

Where the rider crashed was just
coming out of the last tricky corner and
it looked like he may have ridden over
some botts dots in the corner and it
put him down.  As for injuries, he may
have broken his hip, so although his
bike was totaled and the holidays were
ruined – he was still alive to ride
another day.

Another motorcycle down accident
happened later in a different area
without serious injuries so this turned
out to be a typical Sunday on Hwy 94.
This is why the Highway Patrol tends to
work extra patrol on weekends on Hwy
94.

So, be careful out there where ever
you ride and stay within your riding
experience and the bike's capabilities.